Mason Jar Oil Lamp – Practical & Pretty

By on November 13, 2013
Mason Jar Oil Lamp – Practical & Pretty 4.50/5 (90.00%) 2 votes

Candles and flame lamps can help you create a romantic atmosphere in  your home. If you are having a dinner date, spending at home with your love one, or just pampering yourself, lighting a scented flame can really set the atmosphere. With this simple DIY  you can create a lamp with ingredients and materials found in the kitchen. In fact this homemade olive oil lamp cost much cheaper compared to candles. I’ve made these with peppermint oil, cinnamon oil & sticks, rose oil & dried roses as well as with lavender essential oil & lavender buds. Any combination makes a lovely gift, if even for yourself! Making one is simple.

How To Make a Mason Jar Oil Lamp:

Materials Needed:

  • A wide-mouthed glass jar (a quart-size wide-mouthed canning jar works really well)
  • A short length of flexible steel wire (1 1/2 or 2 times the height of the jar)
  • A wick
  • Olive oil
  • Essential oil or fragrance oil (optional)
  • dried flowers, herbs  or spices (optional)
how_to_make_masor_jar_oil_lamp_supplies

Supplies You Need To Make A Mason Jar Oil Lamp

Step One

Wrap and Coil Wire to Make Hook


Use the steel wire to create a long hook. Wrap the wire back and forth so you have several strands making up the length. Make the wire piece the same height as the jar. It will help hold the wire and can also be use as a handle to help pull the wick up for lighting.

 

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Wire needed to make coil for your oil lamp

 

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Twist and bend the wire to make a piece that is several strands wide.

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Coil the wire around a pencil or small stick so the wire has a handle.

 

Step Two

Make Wire Coil For Wick

Measure the wire at this point and make sure it is a couple of inches taller than your jar. At the other end of the wire from your handle coil, make another, looser coil. This will serve as a wick stand with about an inch or two tall that sits on the bottom of the jar.

 

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After one coil is made, make the wire piece a few inches taller than your jar.

 

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Wrap the other end of the wire loosely around a pencil or stick to make a loose coil for your wick.

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You will end up with two coils, one on each end of your wire

 

Step Three

Cut Wick and Attach to Wire

Create enough length of wick allowing it to stick up above the wire coil. While the remaining length of the wick is covered with olive oil.

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Add the wick to the coil you just made.

 

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Twist the wire around the wick to secure it.

 

Step Four

Add Oil

Pour the olive oil into the jar. Make sure enough amount of olive is is poured into the jar. This is just under where the wick is pinched leaving enough space for the wick not to totally soak with olive oil.

Remember

For a few ounces of oil, the lamp will use for several hours.

 

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Add the olive oil to the mason jar lamp.

Step Five (optional)

Additions

You can add herbs and spices to add a romantic scent in the atmosphere.

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Add essential oil or fragrance oil to your lamp for aroma.

 

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Add dried flowers, spices or herbs to your lamp to add interest as well as aroma.

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Stir the mixture gently to incorporate the added ingredients.

 

 

Step Six

Light & Enjoy!

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Your mason jar olive oil lamp is ready to light and use.

MasonJarOilLamp

Mason Jar Olive Oil Lamp

Watch our video showing you how to make a mason jar olive oil lamp:



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About Stephanie

Stephanie is the executive editor of DIYready.com. She is curious, creative, and an expert mess maker who is not afraid to try anything a couple of times to get it right. Her specialties are inventing things, writing no nonsense clear instructions, artistic endeavors, paper crafts, digital media, kids crafts, creating recipes and figuring out new and better ways to do almost anything. Stephanie is a DIY guru who thinks maybe she should have been banned from DIY forums years ago, but enjoys being part information junkie, mad scientist, uncertified gourmet chef and mom of three budding DIY enthusiasts.


6 Comments

  1. DONNIE SMITH

    December 7, 2013 at 8:55 pm

    NICE

  2. Rodney Dove

    December 7, 2013 at 11:24 pm

    COOL

  3. MB

    December 8, 2013 at 7:58 am

    Caution: this works, but should ONLY be used under constant adult supervision.

    SERIOUS fire risk…. the jar should NOT be placed near curtains, or open windows, or anywhere containing flammable material.

  4. Pingback: 36 DIY Weekend Projects for Preparedness and Survival - DIY Ready - DIY Ready

  5. William

    March 7, 2014 at 8:55 pm

    I used to make oil lamps using a coiled wire, but the problem with them is you have to keep adjusting the height of the wick as the oil is consumed and the level drops. The solution? A FLOATING wick: Cut in half lengthways a cork from a wine or champagne bottle, make a hole through the center of it (with a sharply tapered knife and cutting board, or a drill), wrap a layer of aluminum foil around it (or cut a 3/4″ ring out of the side of an aluminum can), poke a hole through it, and insert a cotton wick, like a strand from a cotton mop, rope, or rag — or even a short length of tightly rolled toilet tissue or paper towel. Adjust wick to just less than a quarter inch high (5 mm) — higher and will smoke. Fill jar with vegetable oil (olive oil is best or even animal lard in a pinch, like the Eskimos), dip wick in oil, light, and float. Will burn for hours without adjustment.

  6. William

    March 7, 2014 at 9:04 pm

    Also, I recommend using a SMALL jar, so it’s easily portable in bag or even a large pocket. I also prefer to not add any other ingredients. Essential oils don’t produce much fragrance, because they just burn up, so are wasted.

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